Posted in On Writing, organization

GDPR makes my brain hurt

I’m neither a lawyer nor a web developer and legalese gives me a headache. I’ve been wading through a sea of information for nearly two weeks and I still can’t figure out if this blog is GDPR compliant. I’ve been in what feels like an endless loop of developers, font providers, hosts and big fancy words to try and avoid getting in trouble with my European followers.

I haven’t figured it out, yet, but I will tell you this. If you want to sign up for my newsletter, I’ll need your email address and your permission. If you want to comment on my site, I’m asking for a name and email because it cuts down on the amount of spam comments unrelated to the reason you came to this site. Plus, if you decide to follow the thread, it will send you an email if there are changes in the response. If you sign up to follow this blog, you will get an email when I post.

The only thing I personally do with the data on this site, is get excited when I see a map of my visitors. Thank you for letting me do that. I love maps.

Sometimes ads appear at the bottom of this site, so I suppose cookies are collected somewhere and used by someone. I’ll keep digging through the GDPR words until I find answers that satisfy me.

Posted in Christmas, First Friday Five, Writing

First Friday Five I love #Maps

Give me a good infographic and I’m a happy girl. Put that same information on a map and I get downright giddy.  Here are five maps that I love.  Most are links because I don’t want to get in trouble, but they are all click-worthy.

  1. I cannot find the original maps created by Joshua Katz as part of his dissertation research, but this summary on Business Insider has some of my favorite linguistic maps that prove Americans really don’t speak the same language. Come for crustaceans, stay for the crayons.
    http://www.businessinsider.com/22-maps-that-show-the-deepest-linguistic-conflicts-in-america-2013-6
  2. Ever wonder what some of those languages you hear on the street are?  Slate put together a series of maps based on census data.  Maps like these are a great way to layer flavor into a contemporary setting.   http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/culturebox/2014/05/language_map_what_s_the_most_popular_language_in_your_state.html
  3.  Writing and need to make sure your character’s drink of choice is mainstream or freakishly weird? The good folks at finedininglovers.com can help.  https://www.finedininglovers.com/blog/food-drinks/infographic-united-states-of-alcohol/
  4. Not sure what holiday toy to buy for that great-niece in another state? Last winter this helpful map made the rounds based on google searches by state.  I’m looking forward to seeing what this year brings. I will add to the Lego totals for Minnesota.
  5.  This last one may be the most awesome interactive map I’ve come across. ZatoNovo published a map by Brian Rowe that lets you enter a name and watch how the name changed in popularity over the last 120 years.  For fun, try female names like Jennifer, Cora, and Hermione. Maybe I’m easily amused, but this combines my loves of names, history and geography in one swell place. http://zatonovo.com/dataviz/baby_names
Posted in Crimson Romance, Family life, For Writers, Giveaway, South

How do you say it?

According to my husband, I mispronounce “Caramel” and “Crayon.”  Thanks to Joshua Katz, Department of Statistics, NC State University, I’m vindicated.

I love maps as a visual way to display information. This set of maps, devoted to the way Americans stubbornly refuse to speak the same language, is fascinating.  I found them at Business Insider. If you haven’t seen them yet, grab a soda, pop or coke and have fun clicking through our linguistic diversity.

Thinking of fun, have you stopped by the Crimson Romance A Year in Love Anniversary blog hop?  From now through June 25th, you can enter to win one of two $50 gift cards on my site and other participating authors.

Seven of us even co-wrote a short story for you that starts here. You’re welcome.